Christopher Gamaina, a journalist based in Mara Region, received a regional grant from TMF to help him cover a situation that threatened to deny children from poor families a future.

After a series of his stories in a newspaper, the Tarime District Council issued a circular with guidelines on the kind of contributions students could be asked to make and how much should be contributed.

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A series of articles written by journalist Pendo Ndovie on the milk product, S-26, were published locally (This Day, 23 June 2009) and internationally, leading to the removal of the counterfeit product from the Tanzanian market.

After feeding it to her own baby, Pendo Ndovie suspected that S-26 had been tampered with and was not 100% milk. With many other counterfeit and fake products on the market, she was compelled to do her own research and applied for a TMF individual grant to enable this to happen. 'Without the additional funds and support, it would not have been possible to dig deeper into this issue – interviewing pharmacists, shop keepers, mothers, the Tanzania Food and Drugs Authority (TFDA). “It all takes time and a lot of running around”, she says. “Every story I wrote was published and generated a reaction and response”. 

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In 2010 TMF collaborated with the Voices of Africa Media Foundation (VOAMF) to organize a training on mobile phone reporting. One of the five participants was reporter Mugini Jacob, a correspondent for the Daily News based in Tarime District in Mara Region and recipient of a TMF Regional Grant. His outstanding performance as mobile reporter won him two opportunities from VOAMF: training mobile phone reporters in the Democratic Republic of Congo in May 2011 and attendance of the Global Media Forum in Bonn in June, 2011 followed by an extended tour to the Netherlands. 

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Khatib Juma Mjaja, a journalist from Pemba who reports for Zanzibar Leo Newspaper and Sauti ya Zanzibar Radio, did a series of stories on the importance of iodine in salt and the limited iodine stock in Pemba. This followed the release of study findings by the Ministry of Health supported by UNICEF which showed that only one per cent of the 8,494 households tested in Pemba used iodised salt. 

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